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Antique International / Farmall Tractor: Farmall F-14

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This tractor is almost identical to the F12. The only difference one can see right off is the decal and the steering shaft angle. The main difference though was a more powerful engine which was big enough to handle two plows instead of one like the F12.

Farmall F-14 Tractor


Do you have any comments or questions about this tractor? Ever use one? Know anyone who owned one? If so, please join in on the discussion below. Use the form for entering your comments.

Comments on this Tractor

john schacherer wrote on Tuesday, May 28, 2013 (PDT):
  • does an f14 heisler overdrive have a vent or relief valve mine has a plug with a hole and a nail in the filler hole.when i hit a bump, oil comes out . can i put solid plug in
    john schacherer wrote on Tuesday, May 28, 2013 (PDT):
  • does an f14 heisler overdrive have a vent or relief valve mine has a plug with a hole and a nail in the filler hole.when i hit a bump, oil comes out . can i put solid plug in
    Harvey Kirk wrote on Sunday, December 11, 2011 (PST):
  • I have a brand new never used engine block for an f14 . will sell for 500 .
    Marty wrote on Monday, November 22, 2010 (PST):
  • I am working with an Aggie School to renovate my Dad s F-14 tractor, looking for a running parts tractor, I have been advised by the school it needs alot of parts as it s got the proverbial cracked block and head of most of these tractors, plus alot of other old parts from sitting....any words of wisdom out there I m in New England....
    Willie Wages wrote on Friday, September 24, 2010 (PDT):
  • I picked up a junk tractor that looks a lot like the f-14. How can tell what it is I don t have a genuine concern with tractors but, since it s so old maybe someone can use a part off it before I junk it
    Dave13 wrote on Monday, June 07, 2010 (PDT):
  • i am looking for a heisler overdrive for my farmall f 12. the f 12 is the only tractor i have right now and i need to haul manure this summer from the farm to the field. if you have one for sale or you know someone that has one for sale or you know where i can get one, Please contact me. Thank you.
    Brody Howard Edlund wrote on Tuesday, November 24, 2009 (PST):
  • I got another pair of steel wheels and put them on my F14 - will this hurt the motor in anyway
    Brody Edlund wrote on Friday, November 13, 2009 (PST):
  • Steel wheels -- on my F- 14 -- but what is the chain drive wheel on the outside of the Wheel for
    Richard Borowicz wrote on Sunday, September 13, 2009 (PDT):
  • I restored the first tractor I ever drove in the field in Aug. 1941 at age 8yrs. It is a F-14, #FS134216 built in May 1938. I acquired it in 1999 and completed restoration in Aug. 2003, 62 years after I first drove it. It was shedded FOR 25yrs., in really bad shape, but many hours and 5000 restored, looks, and runs great,
    Richard Borowicz wrote on Sunday, September 13, 2009 (PDT):
  • I restored the first tractor I ever drove in the field in Aug. 1941 at age 8yrs. It is a F-14, #FS134216 built in May 1938. I acquired it in 1999 and completed restoration in Aug. 2003, 62 years after I first drove it. It was shedded FOR 25yrs., in really bad shape, but many hours and 5000 restored, looks, and runs great,
    Gerald Hyde wrote on Monday, July 06, 2009 (PDT):
  • I have a set of right and left hand hydraulic plows for a 1939 F-14 tractor. They have been outside for about 8 years, so they are some rusty, but all there in working condition. If anyone is interested, I am in NY state between Ithaca and Binghamton. Jerry Hyde
    Larry Te Grotenhuis wrote on Monday, March 17, 2008 (PDT):
  • I am in the process of restoring a 1939 F-14 that was equiped with small rectangular tank that was bolted into the hood just ahead of the fuel tank. I was told this tank was filled with gasoline and the tractor was started using gasoline and then after reaching running temperature was switched to tractor fuel. Where can I get a tank and fuel line set to hook this up again
    dave langworthy wrote on Wednesday, February 27, 2008 (PST):
  • to jeff brown i have a f 14 in bad shape it sat in the weeds for many years it has the complete mechenicl lift on it with the 1/2 drawbar on it i willsell itor trade it forany thing i can use the tractor is in oregon my sons phone # is 503-5564025 im in arz my phone #928 927 5032
    Terry Rust wrote on Friday, February 01, 2008 (PST):
  • I am looking for a Heisler Overdrive unit or similar unit for my F14.
    gary holtman wrote on Saturday, October 27, 2007 (PDT):
  • My dad bought an F 14 new in 1939. He passed away in 1977.My older brother got the tractor, but, never did anything with it. He let me have it two months ago. I drove the sleeves out with a sledge hammer, decided they looked a lot like C Farmall sleeves. I had a new set of them already. I had to machine .040 off the bottom end and purchased new O rings from Columbus Rubber and gasket Columbus, Mississippi . My son came by yesterday and, after a few turns of the crank, it fired up and ran perfect. I only had to clean the points on the magneto. The spark plugs are one inch national fine bolt size, so, I was able to clean the threads there with atap. I put new bearings in the governor. The main and rod bearings are the same part number as the C I put new tires on this week, 4;00 X 15 on the front, 11.2 X 38 on the rear. It came out new in Nebraska Norfolk with dual tires on the rear. They were replaced with 40 inch singles in 1947. One of my brothers borrowed the tires about 50 years ago and put his F 12 steel wheels on it. They were still on it when I got it, but, my brother gave me a set of H wheels and rims which are 38 . I ve got the tractor repainted now, looking like a pin up I left the little modifications that Daddy made on it, since this was Daddy s tractor, not a purchase from some else. I got the front mounted cultivator with it and hope to get the front mounted buzz saw. By the way, this tractor came out with a road gear and a foot brake along with the hand brakes. While this is still freash on my mind, I ll be glad to help anyone.
    John wrote on Friday, October 19, 2007 (PDT):
  • I would use PB Blaster rather than cola to free an engine.
    Thomas f Stasa wrote on Tuesday, August 28, 2007 (PDT):
  • I am starting to redo f 14 will need good use tires front REAR HOW IS COLA USE ON MOTOR TO UNDO THANK YOU TOM
    rusty bucket wrote on Wednesday, July 18, 2007 (PDT):
  • I need some help!!!! I Recently just restored a 1939 F-14. I wanted a overdrive for it so I purchased a 1938 F-14 that had a overdrive on it. I was going to Install the overdrive on the tractor I have restored. For some reason they would not interchange because the teeth on the gears would not match up to the gear on the inside of the transmission. So I swaped transmissions on the two tractors. Now I have a tractor that wants to run 40 MPH in high 3rd. Even in low first it is to high geared you cannot even start to pull anything. Now, I want to go back to the orginal gears, but I do not want to swap back the transmissions. The overdrive gear has the 20/16 teeth gears and the transmission drive has 18/14 teeth gears. As far as I can tell the transmissions are the same, unless some of the gears inside are different. I am confused because my parts catalog says the drive bevel pinion is a 14 teeth and the power take off pinion is 18 teeth. I want to buy a transmission drive that will fit it but, I m not shure what I need.
    Gary-Miss wrote on Friday, July 13, 2007 (PDT):
  • I mentioned fours years ago, I think, that my brother owned the F-14 my dad bought new in September of 1939 for 900.00 plus dollars with cultivator and 141.00 for John Deers # 5 mower, As of two days ago, I am the proud owner of that F-14. It s the only one I know of with a road gear . Now, I have to make arrangements to get it from North Missouri to Mississippi. As long as I have been trying tp get it, transport shouldn t be a problem. Part of the deal is, I have to have it restored within a year and send my brother a big picture. I ve restored an LA John Deere, a 40 John Deere and a 8N Ford within the past 18 months. I have to freshen up my A Farmall also. It s kind of rare, with ser # FRA 128.
    JEFF BROWN wrote on Thursday, May 10, 2007 (PDT):
  • I have an f-14 with a single bottom moldboard plow that drops by chain drive off the axel.These plows also came with a half drawbar that could be used while the plow was still attached to the tractor.I need this drawbar and brackets.My tractor is very near complete and this part would get me closer.I also need extension rear steel wheels.I only need one extension rim,but won t ask anyone to break up a set.I could use steel cutoff rims instead if anyone has them.I ve had my f-14 for four years now and i m still getting parts together for it.It s been a slow process but i m learning alot and having fun.I grew up on a farm in Ohio tobacco country and I love the old farmalls.I got the fever watching my dad pull his hotrod 656 in the 60 s 70 s.Thanks and hope to hear from someone about the parts.
    S. Dark wrote on Saturday, March 17, 2007 (PST):
  • We have a Farmall F14 that the family has had on the farm in North Carolina all my life. As a boy in the mid fifties, I used it to tend the farm and now that my Father has passed, I am considering selling it. My Father had it in good running order, new paint, etc., and it was driven up until it was parked inside about four years ago. I can still remember the magnito start and my Father telling me to never loop your thumb around the crank in case it kicked because it might break your thumb. I thought I would ask if anyone was interested in purchasing a very good F14 or suggest where I might go to offer it for sale.
    BO wrote on Tuesday, August 15, 2006 (PDT):
  • HI THERE IM LOOKING FOR A F 14 BLOCK OR ENGINR WITH OUT ANY WELDS OR CRACKS OR BREAKS I HAVE MY FATHER INLAWS F 14 HE PASSED AWAY 2 YEARS AGO AND I WANT TO FIX IT AND KEEP IN THE FAMILY IF ANYONE HAS ONE GIVE ME A CALL 330 212 5616 THANKS MUCH BO
    Alan White wrote on Tuesday, August 01, 2006 (PDT):
  • I grew up on an F-14 that my dad bought in the 40's. It was built in 1938. After it sat idle for thirty or so years, I have been able to obtain it from the owner of our former farm. I am now restoring it. It is mostly complete. I am looking for a good used set of 9.5 x 40 or 10 x 40 rear tires. They are hard to find. Anyone who has a set of these will make me very happy. I am located in Southern Idaho, just north of the Utah border.
    Dick Diederich wrote on Thursday, June 15, 2006 (PDT):
  • My dad had a F14 back in 1945. It was alot faster than the horeses. Then in 1950 we got a farmall c
    nelson woolly wrote on Wednesday, February 08, 2006 (PST):
  • Does anyone know the crossreference for an oil filter for a F-14 baldwin filter #PT-70. Also how to clean or take apart a air filter model D-50 International air cleaner for a F-14.
    Josh Stern wrote on Tuesday, October 18, 2005 (PDT):
  • I'm finally getting started on restoring my 1938 F-14. I heard it was only made 2 years, is this true? Also, anyone know where I can get rims and tires that are reasonable? (New Hampshire)
    skip tryon wrote on Thursday, September 09, 2004 (PDT):
  • iam looking for engine spec an torque for engine rod an main bearing on a f12 farmall
    troy rooker wrote on Tuesday, June 22, 2004 (PDT):
  • how many of the f/14 han elecert start on them ? i have one was just dont see many
    sean pace wrote on Sunday, May 30, 2004 (PDT):
  • I need a rear wheel, tire, and posible axle and houseing for a f14 if any one has information I would apreciate it.
    richard adams wrote on Sunday, April 18, 2004 (PDT):
  • I have a 1948 international garden tractor. I need to know where I can get distributor conversation kit? Thanks Rich
    mike keller wrote on Wednesday, February 18, 2004 (PST):
  • looking for parts to convert tractor to starter and hyraulics for a f-14
    kyle smith wrote on Wednesday, December 24, 2003 (PST):
  • i got a f-14and i need a draw bar
    tom moses wrote on Sunday, December 07, 2003 (PST):
  • might say i was raised on the f12&f14 my grand father and father and uncle got anew f14 be fore the war i was born in42 and can rember draging field .for planting at the age of 7or 8yrs old and the on till iwent out on my own at the age of 21yrs old .of course we had a f12 with a walkshaw engine untillsome one forgot to drain water. they would pull a two bottom little genius plow in second gear on levelsand or gravel ground . even had a f-30 good for plowing and eating gasoline but nothing else ,even had a open geard regular orchard type with a over drive trans idle on the road at 25mph on belt it would make a bus saw blade looklike it was standing still too dangerious got rid of it for 300dollars and a jug of hard cider still havent figured who got the better of that one .as far as wheel interchange goes ---f14wheel fit a,M-- f12 wheels fit a,H too find 40inch tires try gemplers Tel.1-800-382-8473or on net-www.gemplers.com also in closing you should try and find either f12--f14 with cultivators mounted on steelwheels or rubber- steering highly accurate-on these tractors in closing dont run either one of these tractors through a nest of ground bees as they are so fast you might think you can out run bees guess agin and wrap your thum around the crank on top and not under it experence is the best teacher
    David wrote on Sunday, November 02, 2003 (PST):
  • We have a F14 that is either a 38 or 39. We bought it fromthe orginal owners son six months ago. He has the bill of sale but wouldn't part with it. We were told that front tires are orginal and the rear tires are new, replaced in the 50's. It has been kept inside thru its life inside when not working and turns on the first crank. He said they debated on spending the extra $8.00 for rubber instead or steel. We were wondering if anyone knew about what the value of this tractor would be. We also have what we think is a b275? It is supposed to be an enlish ford international. does anyone know anything about them or have a picture. thanks
    Shannon wrote on Thursday, October 23, 2003 (PDT):
  • Want to buy a F-14. Send price, condition, and pic if posible.
    jeff brown wrote on Wednesday, October 15, 2003 (PDT):
  • I know nothing about computers , but I recently bought an f-14 and am looking for front steel wheels.I am a long time IHC fan and would love to fix this one up real nice.
    kevin wrote on Saturday, April 26, 2003 (PDT):
  • looking for an F-14 to buy. I'm located in NY and will travel. thanks
    Darlene wrote on Wednesday, April 23, 2003 (PDT):
  • looking for the year of our tractor the serial number is 143038 farmall between the years of 1930 - 1948
    Gary-Mississippi wrote on Saturday, April 12, 2003 (PDT):
  • My dad bought a new F-14 in September, 1939. He passed away in 1977.My Brother still has this tractor at Laredo, Mo This tractor was quite unique. It had a "road gear" lst gear was the same speed as 2nd in the tractors without road gear. It had dual wheels on the rear, something like 4X44 inches. Some asked about the shift pattern. It was the same as an auotmobile floor shift 3 speed, laid on its side. My mother would be 94 now and I recall her telling someone that 50 or so years ago when they were going to drive the '14 while we hauling in hay. Loved that tractor!!! Daddy built a cab for it for gathering corn while we still in Nebraska before heat housers came out. We bought a farm in missourin 46.
    Bob Scherzer wrote on Thursday, April 03, 2003 (PST):
  • Sorry for my above posting requesting help on an overdrive trans for my F12 on this F14 forum but it must have worked. Got a contact on one located less than a 100 miles from me so I drove over today and bought tractor and all. It has a Heisler overdrive so I will be spared the trouble of trying to make one. So thanks guys for the help. Bob
    Bob Scherzer wrote on Wednesday, April 02, 2003 (PST):
  • I have 3 F12's, one is my father's that he traded his team for with the IH dealer for back in 36. The other two I bought for parts tractors but one is on rubber an in better condition than dad's so I have started to restore both. I own and operate a small foundry and machine shop and would like to reproduce an overdrive for the one F12 on rubber if I could get some idea as to the design used. I have yet to see one of these overdrive units so I would like to ask for help in the way of picures or drawings of their design. I can cast the case and cut the gears but need help on gear size and pitch and general set up. Thanks, Bob
    Bill Radil wrote on Thursday, March 06, 2003 (PST):
  • Got a kick at reading some of the comments. I have owned both F-12& F-14 and can tell you that if I ever had to do any real farming again and I was to choose between the two I would take the F-14 hands down. The rpm difference really makes tractor out of it. I remember an old friend of mine who once had an F-12 and sold it to buy a JD B unstyled(I know shame on him!)I was plowing with my first F-14 I had owned. I was using his AC 2x12 plow and we were in some pretty hard gound. My friend was riding along and we were plowing a good 8 inches deep. I had the F-14 in 2nd gear and pulling it with NO problem. My friend said boy this b*#ch really has the sauce. One the best compliments a guy can get from one of the green guys.
    Dave German wrote on Thursday, February 27, 2003 (PST):
  • Dose anyone know when the first F14 was built?
    Dave German wrote on Thursday, February 27, 2003 (PST):
  • Dose anyone know when the first F14 was built?
    wayne wrote on Tuesday, January 28, 2003 (PST):
  • how would you repair the fuel pump on an f-12? i have my father-in-laws f-12 and my dad,s f-14. i am planning on restoring them on down the road. any information on restoring them would be greatly appreciated.
    Jeremie Seedorf wrote on Monday, January 27, 2003 (PST):
  • I need a wide front for a F-14 which would complete my FFA project. Any answers call 507-373-9259 or email me Thanks.
    mark bainbridge wrote on Friday, January 24, 2003 (PST):
  • Looking for a F-14 in NY area to purchase
    Leonard J. Rahilly wrote on Wednesday, January 22, 2003 (PST):
  • (Sorry--made a mistake in the comments just above) (two should read "twenty")
    Leonard J. Rahilly wrote on Wednesday, January 22, 2003 (PST):
  • I guess I can't keep my mouth shut; I just noticed that the steering wheel on the F-14 pictured is not authentic. Late F-12s and all F-14s had a thick, rubber-covered steering wheel. These always cracked over two or thirty years, and I think they are unavailable as parts. Many IH tractors of the late 30s had their steering wheels replaced by those spindly wheels from H or M models (these were probably cooked up to save rubber during WWII; the early H, M, A and B had thick steering wheels, with rubber right down to the hub). No more comments tonight, so breathe a sigh of relief!
    leonard j. rahilly wrote on Wednesday, January 22, 2003 (PST):
  • I just submitted the same comments twice. Apologies. Someone wrote a while back about putting an F-12 manifold on an F-14 and losing power. You would have to check part numbers to see if the F-14 manifold was really different. My guess is that they put a kerosene manifold on an F-14 that had had a gasoline manifold. The kerosene manifold is designed to run hot. I believe there was a valve to set the manifold on "cold" for gasoline, but with a very old and well-used manifold, it could be that the valve (inside the manifold, right in the middle of all those exhaust gases) had gotten burned through. If a kerosene manifold is used in the "hot" position with gasoline, I am pretty certain there would be a power loss--kerosene needed the heat to vaporize properly, but gasoline absolutely does not need that much heat. In the good old days (not so good, actually, except that I was a h. of a lot younger), you could start on gasoline (cold position) and switch to kerosene or distillate (hot position). Supposed to be cheaper. May have been. I tried it once with our McCormick-Deering 10-20, and swore I would never do it again. It is an absolute nuisance to start on gas, switch to kerosene or distillate,keep the curtain up (or shutter closed) to keep the engine really hot, shut off fuel to stop engine (cold kerosene won't start no matter how much you cuss), restart on gas, etc. (f you managed to stall the engine and did not crank it up immediately, you had to drain the carburetor, after shutting off the kerosene valve, then refill with gasoline from the small tank, restart, switch again over to kerosene. Another problem; as soon as an engine on kerosene stops working hard, it "cools off" a bit and starts to sputter. A lot of the early IHC tractors (10-20, F-20 era) were designed for kerosene only. I never knew anyone in my younger days (early 40s) who used kerosene. They just put gas in the kerosene tractors; got a little more power, but not as much as they could have had by raising the compression. Anyone interested in this stuff can compare Nebraska tests for tractors like F-12, Farmall H and M, to see the difference in h.p. between the kerosene/distillate tractors and the high-compression models sold for gas only. Oliver compensated for the loss on kerosene by making the engine of the Oliver 80 Kerosene-Distillate model bigger! Imagine what that brute could do with high compression! (kerosene requires low compression so as not to knock and pound a hole in a piston). Incidentally, there are Nebraska tests of some tractors on both kerosene and distillate (F-20, for example), and the distillate has a nice bit of extra power. Interesting to know if gasoline gives any extra power in the kerosene-distillate engine. I'd guess not much. Any engineers out there who know? A dramatic example of the diffence higher compression + gasoline makes is the postwar John Deere A and B tractors (the "new" models with the upholstered seat, about 1947). These tractors differ very little from the previous models,except for the higher compression and, I think, a manifold designed exclusively for gasoline.
    Leonard J. Rahilly wrote on Wednesday, January 22, 2003 (PST):
  • I see that I wrote something last July! Well, here's some more palaver. The F-14 differed from the F-12 in several ways that can be seen; there is a breather pipe coming down from the valve cover on the right side of the engine; the brake levers are much longer, reaching above the fuel tank (on the F-12, they are very short, and would be very difficult to use for anything other than parking; the automatic wheel brakes made the hand brake levers almost unnecessary--of course, you could always use a hand brake lever to stop a wheel from spinning in the mud); the steering shaft has a u-joint just behind the steering gear, and the steering post is accordingly higher; the seat has a higher pedestal to match the steering wheel's new height (when I was a teenager, I put a u-joint in my father's F-12 steering shaft, and raised the post with a typical farmer's fix; I cut the original post in half and put a piece of pipe between the two parts; ugly, but effective; incidentally, I have seen F-12s with the F-14 steering post, and many people mis-identify such tractors). The F-14 has a little more power than the F-12, acquired entirely by raising the governed full-load speed from 1400 to 1650 rpm. In order to make use of this power, the gearing was changed, so that the F-14 and the F-12 had about the same ground speed. It is not true that the F-12 would not pull two plows (on rubber tires). My father bought a new F-12 on 40" rubber in 1938; it had those lovely castiron wheels that you see reversed in this picture of the F-14. This tractor pulled a 2-12" trailer plow through thick and thin in second gear (the normal plowing gear). Occasionally, in VERY light soil, and not plowing too deeply, the tractor would pull this plow in third gear. This just goes to show what happens when a tractor designed for steel wheels was converted to rubber. The power formerly wasted driving those lugs into the ground went into pulling a larger load, or pulling the same load in (usually) one higher gear. By looking at a series of Nebraska tests, I have estimated the power loss for a steel-wheeled tractor at between 30 and 35% (even more in some of the early tractors, like the Titan 10-20, which had a power-robbing transmission, as best I can tell). Rubber-tired tractors probably lose between 10 and 15% on average. Anyone interested in armchair engineering (I am, obviously!) can take the Nebraska tests and do the averages for many tractors. Be aware that some of the tractors tested on rubber in the late 30s and early 40s either had tires that were too narrow, or not enough weight was added, as there may be quite a bit of slippage in low gear (see the tests for the Farmall M, in which low-gear h.p. runs around 24 (much slippage) compared to a little over 30 in the higher gears). Steel-wheeled tractors seem to lose power as the speed is raised (more effort driving the lugs in, I presume), while rubber-tired tractors seem to have a pretty even power application throughout the gears, except possibly in low if there is a lot of slippage. A neighbor who had had a lot of experience with a steel-wheeled F-12 ("Can't get out of its own way, it's so slow!") was "amazed" at the power our rubber-tired F-12 produced. Sadly, our old bird was left to rust away after the manifold blew out in the sixties. I think it is serving as a parts tractor somewhere in Tractor Heaven. I have no experience with F-14s, but have put in hundreds of hours on two rubber-tired 12s and one with steel wheels. They were wonderfully robust tractors, fairly easy to get on and off of, compact and easy to turn in small spaces, very handy with mounted equipment, like the Quick-Attachable 7' mower and the cultivators. With the big IH drawbar, you could use it for hauling fence posts, barbed wire, pails of feed, even people to and from the fields. About its only weakness was that it (like the F-14) had a fuel pump, and fuel pumps in those days had diaphragms that did not live forever. Minor problem, actually--I think the diaphragms were good for 8-10 years before they split. The only other drawback to the F-12 did not become apparent until you had the chance to drive a tractor with a road gear. The 4-mph top speed of the F-12 was REALLY slow if you had to go a mile to the field, or if you were hauling loads of hay or grain to the barn. I used to lust after a Farmall A (10 mph) or an H (over 16 mph!--a real racing machine on a gravel road; so fast that there was even wind in the face!). Now that I am a lot more mature, I think I'd kinda like to putter along on an F-12, four mph or not. Might even throttle it back and take another half hour to get to the field!
    Leonard J. Rahilly wrote on Wednesday, January 22, 2003 (PST):
  • The F-14 differed from the F-12 in several ways that can be seen; there is a breather pipe coming down from the valve cover on the right side of the engine; the brake levers are much longer, reaching above the fuel tank (on the F-12, they are very short, and would be very difficult to use for anything other than parking; the automatic wheel brakes made the hand brake levers almost unnecessary--of course, you could always use a hand brake lever to stop a wheel from spinning in the mud); the steering shaft has a u-joint just behind the steering gear, and the steering post is accordingly higher; the seat has a higher pedestal to match the steering wheel's new height (when I was a teenager, I put a u-joint in my father's F-12 steering shaft, and raised the post with a typical farmer's fix; I cut the original post in half and put a piece of pipe between the two parts; ugly, but effective; incidentally, I have seen F-12s with the F-14 steering post, and many people mis-identify such tractors). The F-14 has a little more power than the F-12, acquired entirely by raising the governed full-load speed from 1400 to 1650 rpm. In order to make use of this power, the gearing was changed, so that the F-14 and the F-12 had about the same ground speed. It is not true that the F-12 would not pull two plows (on rubber tires). My father bought a new F-12 on 40" rubber in 1938; it had those lovely castiron wheels that you see reversed in this picture of the F-14. This tractor pulled a 2-12" trailer plow through thick and thin in second gear (the normal plowing gear). Occasionally, in VERY light soil, and not plowing too deeply, the tractor would pull this plow in third gear. This just goes to show what happens when a tractor designed for steel wheels was converted to rubber. The power formerly wasted driving those lugs into the ground went into pulling a larger load, or pulling the same load in (usually) one higher gear. By looking at a series of Nebraska tests, I have estimated the power loss for a steel-wheeled tractor at between 30 and 35% (even more in some of the early tractors, like the Titan 10-20, which had a power-robbing transmission, as best I can tell). Rubber-tired tractors probably lose between 10 and 15% on average. Anyone interested in armchair engineering (I am, obviously!) can take the Nebraska tests and do the averages for many tractors. Be aware that some of the tractors tested on rubber in the late 30s and early 40s either had tires that were too narrow, or not enough weight was added, as there may be quite a bit of slippage in low gear (see the tests for the Farmall M, in which low-gear h.p. runs around 24 (much slippage) compared to a little over 30 in the higher gears). Steel-wheeled tractors seem to lose power as the speed is raised (more effort driving the lugs in, I presume), while rubber-tired tractors seem to have a pretty even power application throughout the gears, except possibly in low if there is a lot of slippage. A neighbor who had had a lot of experience with a steel-wheeled F-12 ("Can't get out of its own way, it's so slow!") was "amazed" at the power our rubber-tired F-12 produced. Sadly, our old bird was left to rust away after the manifold blew out in the sixties. I think it is serving as a parts tractor somewhere in Tractor Heaven. I have no experience with F-14s, but have put in hundreds of hours on two rubber-tired 12s and one with steel wheels. They were wonderfully robust tractors, fairly easy to get on and off of, compact and easy to turn in small spaces, very handy with mounted equipment, like the Quick-Attachable 7' mower and the cultivators. With the big IH drawbar, you could use it for hauling fence posts, barbed wire, pails of feed, even people to and from the fields. About its only weakness was that it (like the F-14) had a fuel pump, and fuel pumps in those days had diaphragms that did not live forever. Minor problem, actually--I think the diaphragms were good for 8-10 years before they split. The only other drawback to the F-12 did not become apparent until you had the chance to drive a tractor with a road gear. The 4-mph top speed of the F-12 was REALLY slow if you had to go a mile to the field, or if you were hauling loads of hay or grain to the barn. I used to lust after a Farmall A (10 mph) or an H (over 16 mph!--a real racing machine on a gravel road; so fast that there was even wind in the face!). Now that I am a lot more mature, I think I'd kinda like to putter along on an F-12, four mph or not. Might even throttle it back and take another half hour to get to the field!
    tee wrote on Sunday, January 12, 2003 (PST):
  • does anyone know the shift pattern of a F14.there is nothing on the tractor that shows it and I don't have a clue which gear its in.tractor doesn't run YET. thanks
    Jack Baker wrote on Monday, January 06, 2003 (PST):
  • I've run out of money and just don't have the inclination to restore the cultivators for an F-14. I hate to see them go to waste and wondered if anyone would be interesting in obtaining a full set (front and rear) of cultivators for your tractor? Let me know. jrbaker at remc11.k12.mi.us
    J. kimbell wrote on Sunday, November 10, 2002 (PST):
  • would like to buy an F 14
    Dave Larsen wrote on Wednesday, October 16, 2002 (PDT):
  • Like many of you, I grew up on the F-14, given us new,by a great uncle in 1938. It powered Grandpa's thresher, a Belsaw 12' carriage sawmill, a Belsaw 12" planer, pulled logs to the mill, cut hay with the 7' bar, pulled the wagon and hayloader...........well, all the stuff needed on the farm. I too, started it by standing on the crank, as a young boy, so that we could drive it to Cox's pond up the canyon to go swimming. I am rebuilding it now, after dad had let it sit idle for years when the tires wore out. I have two other F-14's, one running and one for parts, but maybe I'll rebuild both and find other sources for parts. Glad to read other's comments about nostalgic moments with a real friend........the F-14
    peter zelesket wrote on Thursday, August 22, 2002 (PDT):
  • wanted fuel pump for farmall F14. Also a set of valves. Please e-mail if you have these.
    mike keller wrote on Tuesday, August 20, 2002 (PDT):
  • I have a f-14 , I'm interested in finding information on putting a starter on it . Is there any information out there ?
    Leonard J. Rahilly wrote on Friday, July 12, 2002 (PDT):
  • I spent years on 3 F-12s, and although I never used an F-14, I have read up on the differences between it and a 12. It appears that the engine was made "more powerful" just by tightening up the governor spring, to give 1650 rpm full load, if I remember rightly. There is a different pinion going into the gearbox, so that in effect the higher-speed engine was geared down to give about the same ground speeds as the F-12 had. The Nebraska tests show a small increase in horsepower for the F-14, probably enough to make it handle 2 14" plows in good soil. Our rubber-tired F-12 would handle 2 12" plows in second gear in any soil. At that, it was an amazing machine. A neighbor who thought F-12s were "awful puny" because he had only used them on steel was amazed to see what our rubber-tired tractor would pull (this included a 7' double disk harrow, originally bought to be pulled behind a 10-20). I used to chafe at the incredibly slow speed over the road (4 mph tops!), but I still admire the tractor for what it could do, and for how long it lasted (my dad parked his '38 F-12 only after the manifold burned through in the late 60s--a good 30 year run!).
    Rocky Thrall wrote on Wednesday, June 19, 2002 (PDT):
  • My friend is looking for a Farmall F-14 to restore. He lives in the Spokane Washington area. Any help would be appreciated. He doesn't have a computer. Thank You Rocky
    vic schupp wrote on Sunday, May 05, 2002 (PDT):
  • It weights about 3400
    gene zeigler wrote on Monday, February 11, 2002 (PST):
  • As a farm boy in the early 50's my father bought our first tractor a F-12/14 on 36'' rubber it ran up hill. the builders plate said F-12 but it had been changed to F-14 head maifold with breather on side pulled 2btm plow .
    Terry Johnson wrote on Friday, February 08, 2002 (PST):
  • My grandfather purchased a 1938 F-12 complete with front rubber tires, rear steel wheels and rear fenders. He used it mainly for cultivating with the two row mounted cultivator, because he also had a 15-30. His oldest son could operate the hand lift, but when he left home my dad couldn't, so they added the hydraulic lift. They also changed the steel wheels to rubber tires then. When my grandfather died in 1951, my father returned from the Air Force to take over the family farming operation. Dad used the F-14 for many years, but slowly became less dependable and was moved further to the back of the machine shed. Our home town centennial was the reason we decided to restore it three years ago. Dad and I took it completely apart. New rings, valve job, new intake manifold, new tires and new paint. Dad has taken it to several tractor shows and has been very pleased to have won some trophies. I want to use the tractor, but Dad wants to keep it clean. So, I just went and bought an F-12 with a two row cultivator. But the F-14 is still priceless to me and Dad. It will be in our family for another generation for sure. Terry Johnson tjpj4th at netins.net
    JOE SPEAKMAN wrote on Tuesday, February 05, 2002 (PST):
  • Iam looking for parts for a f-14 tractor please send a e-mail and let me know
    Joe Davis wrote on Sunday, January 20, 2002 (PST):
  • Does anyone know how to tell the difference between the F-12 and F-14? I am not sure which one I have but me and my Father are thinking of restoring it. Someone once said you can tell by the steering shaft angle, does anyone know how?
    doug gordon wrote on Wednesday, November 14, 2001 (PST):
  • someone tell me the best way to remove the brake drums from the F-14, all steel, that has been sitting in the woods for about 46 years? any advice would be welcome!
    Scott. Manson wrote on Monday, September 10, 2001 (PDT):
  • i have a f-14 i am working on...need to know where to put sticker on behind the seat by the draw bar, if anyone can help me out or send me a pic i would sure appreciate it...thanks S.Manson
    Skip wrote on Tuesday, August 07, 2001 (PDT):
  • I don't have an F-14 or an O-14 but an I-14. Any information out there would really be appreciated.
    Terry wrote on Thursday, July 19, 2001 (PDT):
  • Anyone have experience with an F-14 in an antique tractor pull? What tire pressure did you use? Any other suggestions welcome.
    Dennis S. wrote on Saturday, May 19, 2001 (PDT):
  • For years a F-14 was the only tractors on my Dad's farm (really a hobby farm, I guess). It was a multi-fuel, and had the little tank on top of the hood. That tractor was the first I drove and the4 first I started by myself. I knew where to set the Mag advance so it wouldn't kick. I don't know how little I was, but I remember setting the crank sideways and getting on top of it to swing it. And did I catch -ell for that! But that "old" tractor was the only tractor to start when it got to twenty below and stayed there for a week. That "14" was belted to the neighbors JD's to start them, and they had been sitting in a nice warm barn all night. The "14" sat outside under a tree, while our new tractor sat in the shed and also refused to start.
    Rick wrote on Sunday, May 06, 2001 (PDT):
  • I have an F-14 for sale. Sat outside for the past 40 years. Located in Wisconsin. Any idea what it might be worth? Thanks
    Ron M wrote on Saturday, April 14, 2001 (PDT):
  • Does anyone know if fenders were an option on the F 14? A saw one with fenders at a show 3 or 4 years ago and haven't seen another since.
    Frank wrote on Wednesday, April 11, 2001 (PDT):
  • I am looking for air cleaner pieces Top cap, spout, and bottom bowl piece. Will buy or trade for other assorted parts I have almost a hole spare parts tractor. Please send me a email.
    Lindsay Schlaud wrote on Monday, March 12, 2001 (PST):
  • Iwould like to comment about power between the F-12 and the F-14. My dad has the F-14 and I have the 12. His manifold went bad so he put the F-12 manifold on and the power dropped way down. That one went bad and he found another good F-14 manifold and now it has the power that it used to.I know some books say that the F-14 runs more RPM. That is the reason for more power. I feel its the manifolds. Does anyone agree with me Or know for sure? Thankyou!!
    Lindsay Schlaud wrote on Saturday, March 10, 2001 (PST):
  • Ihave an F-12 with original wide front end. I have only seen one other one. I also have the two speed transmission. Was wondering anybody knows how rare this is? It was appraised in 1992 at little over 3000 dollars. Is this because of the wide front end? Thankyou for any comments!
    Jeremy Smith wrote on Friday, December 01, 2000 (PST):
  • I have a 1938 F-14. I would like to know where I can get parts and tires(900-40tire)for my F-14. Thanks Jeremy
    Niall Estes wrote on Friday, December 01, 2000 (PST):
  • I like the picture. My dad has a 1938 F-14. It is very nice.
    Niall Estes wrote on Friday, December 01, 2000 (PST):
  • I like the picture. My dad has a 1938 F-14. It is very nice.
    R.D. H wrote on Monday, November 20, 2000 (PST):
  • I have a F-14, serial number 155563 and I would like to know what kind of value to sell these for. The motor is seized up so it will not run and all of the tractor is there. Thanks RDH
    Robert Hanke wrote on Saturday, October 21, 2000 (PDT):
  • My father has two 1939 f-14 tractors to restore into one. As the mechanic in the family I have been recruited to help. Also with internet expierence I am sendind out a plea. We are looking for a front steel wheel for our single wheel front end. Anybody know of one?
    Dale "The Tractor Guy" wrote on Thursday, October 05, 2000 (PDT):
  • I enjoyed the comments. I assume the Coca Cola is used to pour into the cylinders through the spark plug holes to free stuck rings/pistons. I just purchased a Farmall F-14, 1939. Looking forward to fixing it. Carburetor is being overhauled back in Missouri, need one rear tire and 2 front tires, clean gas tank, clean and lubricate governor parts leading to carburetor, change oil and filter, and then plugs. I will then start it and drive it. I am missing sheet metal above the hood, under the steering shaft, above the carburetor. It is a small piece. Know where I can find it? Dale "The Tractor Guy" in Loomis, CA
    Stuart MacFarlane wrote on Sunday, October 01, 2000 (PDT):
  • I own my grandfathers 1938 F14 on steel, totally reconditioned runs like new. What is this Coca-Cola? I know where one can get rubber mounted wheels and also steel covers designed to go go over rear wheel spikes so you can drive on pavement.
    Roger Zeratsky wrote on Friday, September 29, 2000 (PDT):
  • Need some narrow 40" tires reasonable for my f-12 any leads? Thanks
    Rick Freese wrote on Saturday, September 23, 2000 (PDT):
  • Help! Have a good F-14 ready for paint. I'm looking for 9-40 or 10-40-inch tires (used in good condition). Please e-mail with location/price. Need a pair.
    James J. Long wrote on Sunday, July 23, 2000 (PDT):
  • I am in the process of restoring a 1938 F-14. Runs great! Just been painted, has hydraulic lift under seat,only thing left to do is recover steering wheel. I love my F14! JAS.
    Ya Mum wrote on Saturday, July 22, 2000 (PDT):
  • These tractors are quite interesting.
    Dot Woodwind wrote on Monday, July 17, 2000 (PDT):
  • How does one use Coca-Cola to remedy a siezed engine?
    Brian Lambert wrote on Sunday, June 04, 2000 (PDT):
  • I am looking for parts for an F-14 farmall tractor and they are for electric start delco remy. The parts are bellhousing with starter mount flywheel with teeth and starter info. contact me at e-mail address listed above.
    bill wrote on Thursday, June 01, 2000 (PDT):
  • Where can one get a shop manual, original or reprint for an F-14?
    Jack Baker wrote on Wednesday, May 31, 2000 (PDT):
  • I'm going to try this again. Production Serial Numbers for the F-14 FS 124000 to FS 139606 were built in 1938 FS 117518 to FS 155902 were built in 1939
    Vic Albrandt wrote on Sunday, March 26, 2000 (PST):
  • My Dad traded an f-12 in on a new F- 14 in 1938 It was a tri- cycle front, all on rubber. Cost around $600 new.
    Jennifer Dodge wrote on Friday, March 17, 2000 (PST):
  • My husband owns tow farmall tractors and this one is really pretty. We are a tractor family,owning five antique tractors.It's a family function at our house. We love the tractor shows. This tracotr on here is a real beauty!
    Bill McMillan wrote on Friday, March 10, 2000 (PST):
  • I have a F14 on steel wheels. It has been in storage for a long time. I have just started to look at it, it has wooden fenders. Is that original?
    cal wrote on Wednesday, March 08, 2000 (PST):
  • others than steel and 10x40 9x40 what other rubber size was used on f14
    BRIAN HENTE wrote on Monday, February 07, 2000 (PST):
  • I AM LOOKING FOR A SET OF ROUND SPOKE WHEELS FOR THE FRONT OF A F-12 OR F-14. IF ANYBODY HAS ANY INFORMATION ON WHERE I COULD GET SOME PLEASE EMAIL ME AT hente at marz.com
    Alex Dwyer wrote on Monday, November 15, 1999 (PST):
  • Produced from 1938 to 1939
    Alex Dwyer wrote on Monday, November 15, 1999 (PST):
  • I have 3 F-14's and have recently acquired one on full steel with considerably good sheet metal. The engine is siezed but I will take care of that with some Coca-Cola.
    Steve Wiesner wrote on Friday, October 29, 1999 (PDT):
  • Does anyone know the years that the f-14 was in production?
    Marc Studer wrote on Friday, September 10, 1999 (PDT):
  • I have an opportunity to bid on an F-14 at a local auction. The tractor is listed as good for parts, but everthing is there on the tractor. The engine is seized up. How much is too much to bid on it. I have been checking around, but am still looking for advice.


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